Improving Your Health Is A Personal Process:

  • Workout Goals. Do you want to run a marathon, master kickboxing, or simply increase your strength and stamina? Creating goals can help you decide which type of exercise is best for you.
  • Fitness Level. Do you already exercise regularly, or would you like to get in shape after being inactive for a few years? It’s important to consider your fitness level before you begin. Injuries aren’t the only possibility if you’re overly ambitious when you begin your new workout plan. If the plan is too challenging, you may be more likely to become frustrated and stop exercising.
  • Routine. How much time do you have to devote to exercise every week? Creating a workout plan that fits your lifestyle is the key to achieving your goals.
  • Health. Your health will also be an important consideration when beginning a new workout plan. For example, people who have asthma may need to avoid activities that involve running, as prolonged, intense activity may trigger a flare-up of asthma symptoms. The American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology recommends swimming, walking or activities that require a short burst of energy rather than long-distance running, soccer or basketball.
  • Pain and Injuries. Pain won’t necessarily prevent you from working out. In fact, exercise can help loosen and strengthen your muscles and joints while also decreasing pain. Your chiropractor can help you choose exercises that won’t aggravate or worsen your condition. He can also give you a few hints that will help you avoid injuries while working out.

Once you’ve identified your goals and evaluated your fitness level, you’ll be prepared to create a plan that will help you meet your objectives. The best plans include warm-ups, rest days and an exercise schedule that gradually increases the length, duration, and intensity of your workout. If you work out too hard or long, you’ll increase your risk of sprains, strains, fractures, inflammation, and overuse injuries.